‘Dehumanise’ is the third single to be released from the new album EYE TO EYE from New Zealand’s Lords of Loud, The Datsuns.

Emotions railing against the system. A homogenous future, devoid of the very thing that makes man, man. Freedom & individualism are outcast. The here & now is a seething, twisted mass. The Datsuns strap those feelings to some rock & roll. “Dehumanise” is stomping three chord-age, dive bombing stun gun lead, a bed of surging Hammond keys, stair tumbling stop/start riddims. Key tinkling, fat fuzz wah & squeal.

“Dehumanise is another Sci-Fi inspired number, about being literally stripped down to your utilitarian parts by the machines and machinations around you. The main parts were written on tour, opening for Graveyard in Europe some years back. I was listening to a ton of heavy 70’s rarities at the time, sampling their drum intros in Garageband to make demos. This one features more custom fuzz guitar FX courtesy of Christian and also my first attempt at a synth solo, wild!” – Dolf Datsun

Directed by Sam Kristofski, an accompanying video for the Sci-Fi inspired, dystopian riff rocker is released today.

Says Sam, “I shot this clip with expired reversal black and white film which was hand-processed here in NZ. I then painted all the colours into the film using a number of different pens and inks frame by frame. I also used a bunch of blades and tools to scratch into the film and create things like lightning effects and lines. Len Lye was one of the first people in the world to use this effect on film before colour film was a common thing. He was from Christchurch and took the film to New York, so this technique is really a strong part of New Zealand’s film history. It would have been one of the first accounts of projected colour film.”

The second single to be taken from the album, the heavy psych track ‘Suspicion’ has also belatedly been released as a limited edition 7″. And, the bands seventh studio album Eye To Eye will be released as a limited edition white version.

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